Anyone read any good books lately?

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Espy
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Anyone read any good books lately?

Postby Espy » Tue Aug 29, 2006 1:50 am

I just finished Howl's Moving Castle by Diana Wynne Jones about an hour ago. BEST BOOK EVER. :mrgreen: No lie. I'm obsessed with it. Really, horribly, terribly, scarily, obsessed with it. To a point that's probably unhealthy. I mean, I have three friends that want to borrow it from me, and I am very tempted to tell them to go buy their own, because I love it so much. It's my precious. Anyone else read it? If you haven't, you need to go buy it or borrow it from the library right now. Or really soon.

And I'm madly in love with Howl. I will marry him one day. Even if he is just a character in a book. I'll find a way to get him out of there. ...Yeah, I tend to fall in love with characters in books more than I fall in love with real people. 'Smatter of fact, I have been in love with several book characters, but no one who's real... Not even an actor. :oops: Oh well, that's me I guess.

But see, lookie, I changed my avatar thingie to a picture of Howl from the movie (which I have yet to see, so no telling me 'bouts it), and I changed my signature to one of my favorite quotes from Howl in the book. Yes, I have a very unheathy obsession indeed.

But like I originally said, anyone else read any good books as of late?
"Yes, you are nosy. You're a dreadfully nosy, horribly bossy, appallingly clean old woman. Control yourself. You're victimizing us all."

~Howl (Howl's Moving Castle by Diana Wynne Jones)

Dreaming Pepper
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Postby Dreaming Pepper » Tue Aug 29, 2006 2:07 am

Do articles count?

If so...than .."the musical dream revisited: Music and language in Dreams" by Irving J Massey from U. of Buffalo.

Verrry interesting research! One impressive facet is that while words and images may be distorted in our dreams, but not music. Music overrides words. And being that music/song are mainly a right hemisphere function, it adopts, but also, suboridnates language. Dreams also are related to the right hemisphere dominance during sleep.

So maybe, one can say, that a correlation in that music and dreams are the same or at least stem from the same region of the brain.

I am pretty sure that has been said and claimed, but at least there is growing research on it. :wink:
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Espy
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Postby Espy » Tue Aug 29, 2006 2:32 am

Dreaming Pepper wrote:Do articles count?

If so...than .."the musical dream revisited: Music and language in Dreams" by Irving J Massey from U. of Buffalo.

Verrry interesting research! One impressive facet is that while words and images may be distorted in our dreams, but not music. Music overrides words. And being that music/song are mainly a right hemisphere function, it adopts, but also, suboridnates language. Dreams also are related to the right hemisphere dominance during sleep.

So maybe, one can say, that a correlation in that music and dreams are the same or at least stem from the same region of the brain.

I am pretty sure that has been said and claimed, but at least there is growing research on it. :wink:


Intersting! Sounds like a good artical. I'm fascinated with dreams and things of the like- don't have much time to read up on them though, I'm to busy reading fantasy stories 24/7. No time to read anything else. :P I'll mean to, but then I'll see a fantasy or mythology book that catches my eye, and then anything else I wanted to read tends to get pushed back- and then just sort of rots away in my brain until it's forgotten.
"Yes, you are nosy. You're a dreadfully nosy, horribly bossy, appallingly clean old woman. Control yourself. You're victimizing us all."



~Howl (Howl's Moving Castle by Diana Wynne Jones)

Ang Mo
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Postby Ang Mo » Tue Aug 29, 2006 4:37 am

Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance A classic best seller. I think Pirsig has recorded some of the best musings and thoughts on written record. Some of them really make me laugh.
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Postby ben » Tue Aug 29, 2006 6:44 am

Tales from the Far Side by Gary Larson. That guy is plain genius! From amoebas to cavemen to cows and aliens, pure genius... oooopss :lol:


Seriously, my reading habits have long been in a dump. John Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men had been in my possession for over a month now and I'd still have to read page 1.
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Postby darthscsi » Tue Aug 29, 2006 8:19 pm

Mort by Terry Pratchet. Another guy who is pure genius, just with more words and fewer pictures than Larson.[/b]

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Postby rahau » Thu Aug 31, 2006 4:20 am

A few weeks ago, I read Julie Otsuka’s phenomenal novel, “When The Emperor Was Divine,” about the internment of Japanese-Americans during World War Two.

I first became aware of this book several months ago, when the opening chapter, “Evacuation Order No. 19” was read on NPR’s “Selected Shorts.” When the reading ended, I was in a state of stunned speechlessness. I had the same feeling when I finished the book.

Otsuka’s prose is very lean and spare, nothing flowery or ostentatious. Yet almost every paragraph has a certain telling detail, or turn of phrase, or bit of symbolism, that leaves a lump in the throat. None of the main characters are identified by name. They are, simply, a Japanese-American family named The Woman, The Girl, and The Boy. (The Man had already been arrested, and sent to a different camp.)

Otsuka leaves no doubt that the end of the internment was not the end of the ordeal. The damage lasted for years after the war ended. There are, sadly, some wounds that never heal. One finishes this book with feelings of deep heartbreak and outrage.

I can’t resist providing an excerpt. This is from Chapter One. The Woman has just learned of “Evacuation Order No. 19.” She and her children must leave their home in Berkeley, and report to a camp.

_____________________________________________________________



She put down two quarters on the counter. He pushed the quarters back toward her across the counter but did not look at her. “You can pay me later,” he said. Then he began to wipe the side of the register with a rag. There was a dark stain that would not go away.

“I can pay you now,” said the woman.

“Don’t worry about it,” said Joe Lundy. He reached into his shirt pocket and gave her two caramel candies wrapped in gold foil. “For the children,” he said. She slipped the caramels into her purse but left the money. She thanked him for the candy and walked out of the store.

“That’s a nice red dress,” he called out after her.

She turned around and squinted at him over the top of her glasses. “Thank you,” she said. “Thank you, Joe.” Then the door slammed behind her and she was alone on the sidewalk and she realized that in all the years she had been going to Joe Lundy’s store she had never before called him by his name, Joe. It sounded strange to her. Wrong, almost. But she had said it. She had said it out loud. She wished she had said it earlier.
Last edited by rahau on Thu Aug 31, 2006 6:30 am, edited 1 time in total.

Ang Mo
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Postby Ang Mo » Thu Aug 31, 2006 5:23 am

The insanity and hysteria of the internment camps. What is truly odd and sort of a paradox I guess is that Hawaii was the only state that sustained a major attack from the Japanese and yet they were the only ones not to intern the local Japanese citizens.

All the more reason for Vienna to give a concert in Hawaii as a reward for their forward thinking. Why I hear Scot's backyard would be a phenomenal place for fans to be interned if Vienna was to hold an audience captive with her singing. If not there......then Pahoa..........I just like the name of the town and its peculiar architecture.
--the only adults who are never depressed: chuckleheads, California surfers, and fundamentalist Christians who believe they have had a personal encounter with Jesus and are saved once and for all. Would you trade your depression to become any of these?

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Postby Scot » Fri Sep 01, 2006 8:49 am

Zen and Gary Larson- excellent choices.

I'm just finishing I am a Cat (watakushi wa neko de aru)- book III. Excellent stuff!

s
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wolding
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Postby wolding » Fri Sep 01, 2006 3:46 pm

Well, since I'm decidedly over-the-hill age-wise, I'm not sure I should admit this. But I took Espy's advice and bought "Howl's Moving Castle". 7 bucks for a paper back wasn't such a risk.
It turned out to be a very good story. I enjoyed it very much!
Bill

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Postby Espy » Sat Sep 02, 2006 11:40 pm

rahau wrote:A few weeks ago, I read Julie Otsuka’s phenomenal novel, “When The Emperor Was Divine,” about the internment of Japanese-Americans during World War Two.


I did a report on the internment of Japanese-Americans during World War Two last year. I hadn't really known anything about it up until then- it really opened my eyes to some things. I read a book about the camps called 'The Children of Topaz' and I cried and cried- it's hard for me to read about kids haveing to go through things like that. I read several other books too- I'm pretty sure I cried at least once during all of them.

And thank you for that wonderful excerpt. It sounds like a very good book, I'll have to go out and get it sometime.



wolding- I'm glad you enjoyed it! :) It's one of my favorite books, so I'm glad you read it- most of my friends have seen the movie, only one has read the book, so it's nice to hear about someone else reading it too. I have to ask, did you have a favorite character?
"Yes, you are nosy. You're a dreadfully nosy, horribly bossy, appallingly clean old woman. Control yourself. You're victimizing us all."



~Howl (Howl's Moving Castle by Diana Wynne Jones)

parari
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Postby parari » Mon Sep 04, 2006 4:46 pm

I've been reading a collection of short stories by Theodora Goss, called "In The Forest of Forgetting". It's a surreal, eccentric thing that crosses back and forth between reality and fairytale-ism. Recommended for those who like to think overly much and who like dark chocolate (because it's one of those gothic, light bittersweet collections that remind me of that flavor).

I read Howl's Moving Castle a while ago-- I bought it for my friend's birthday and borrowed it from her. It's very good, and it made me realize even more that some of the best books aren't full of ornamental phrases and pretty syntax, but are thoughtful and have meaning in every word.

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Postby wolding » Tue Sep 05, 2006 3:26 am

Hi Espy,
I identified most with Michael - the faithful apprentice always ready to help out and trying to learn at the same time. He also seemed to be the most level-headed of the characters.

I kept waiting for Sophie to remember that she had told the scarecrow to come alive and help her make her fortune. Then she would have stopped being afraid of him.

This story reminded me very much of an old favorite of mine, called "Into The Suicide Mountains", by John Gardner. I was going to recommend it to you, until I realized it was printed in 1977. You might find it in a library. It is a good story about a young man who wants to climb a mountain to throw himself off. Instead, he meets characters who help him fulfill his destiny and make a success of himself.


Bill

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reading

Postby legio_ix » Wed Sep 13, 2006 7:26 pm

just finished Jasper FFordes The Eyre Affair. Mad as hatters and brilliantly done, the principal character is called Miss Thursday Next, her boyfriend is Landen Park-Laine (london, park lane, in a cockney accent :D ). Her swindon co-workers are all named after areas from the Uk met office shipping forcast (Tyne Dogger Fisher, and... Herr Bight) - sheer brilliance and completely crazy - Jane Eyre gets kidnapped from the book!

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Postby legio_ix » Wed Sep 13, 2006 8:16 pm

and of course i recommend the Lymond chronicles by Dorothy Dunnett - Absolutely fantastic and honest the cleverest books i've ever seen written - you generally need a working knowledge of french and latin to read them with spattering of german, italien, spanish and some turkish wouldnt come amiss either, plus a fairly wide base of poems, classics and general english literature to catch all the many references. Lymond, sometimes scottish noble, outlaw, criminal, flawed hero, statesman, poet, bard and countless other persona rips through the courts of 16th century Europe with an entourage of equally fantastic compatriots. the first title is Game of Kings set in scotland, the second Queens Play in the courts of Henri II of france, The Disorderly knights variously in malta and turkey, Pawn in Frankincense across Turkey, The Ringed Castle in the court of Tzar Ivan the terrible of Russia, and finally Checkmate, variously in France, England and Scotland.


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